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Leder
Åpen tilgang
(side 5-7)
av Arnulf Mattes
Editorial
Åpen tilgang
(side 8-10)
av Arnulf Mattes
Åpen tilgang
Vitenskapelig publikasjon
(side 11-41)
av Michael Custodis
Sammendrag

Within the vast field of research that still has to be done on Norway's music life during the years of the Nazi occupation, the area of music in military settings is an exception. Because of the sometimes contradictory motives of the different protagonists, this article shows strategies for music among NS and Hird musikkorps, the military resistance movement Milorg, and even inside SS prison camps. Based on extensive archival material, this article gives an overview of official Norwegian and German music units, the newly founded musikkorps for Hird, and military musicians who resisted intense pressure to join these units. It also discusses the importance of singing for resistance fighters and prisoners.

Åpen tilgang
Vitenskapelig publikasjon
(side 42-56)
av Ina Rupprecht
Sammendrag

Since both Edvard Grieg’s 175th birthday and Norwegian military music’s 200th anniversary are celebrated in 2018, a first look at compositions by Grieg for military music was in order. As one of Norway’s most popular and beloved composers, his works made it into the different repertoires, despite not being known for military compositions; instead his popular pieces were adapted. Military music bands in Halden, Oslo, Kristiansand, Bergen, Trondheim and Harstad played arrangements of his compositions. Today the archive inventory catalogues at the Forsvarsmuseum in Oslo present a wide range of Grieg arrangements from different decades and Norwegian military music bands. Arrangements of Grieg’s Landkjending, Sigurd Jorsalfar, Olav Trygvason, the F-dur Sonate or Bergliot are natural parts of the Norwegian military music’s repertoire. Several conductors, as for example Ole Olsen and Oscar Borg, promoted Norwegian compositions as a way to strengthen Norwegian national identity. The questions the archive catalogues are to provide information about are, which bands played what, what are the similarities or differences, and perhaps even when were the compositions included into the respective repertoires, and whether they have a national agenda.

Åpen tilgang
Vitenskapelig publikasjon
(side 57-78)
av Bjørnar Utne-Reitan
Engelsk sammendrag

This paper presents a closer look at Grieg’s music theory studies from his time as a student at the Leipzig conservatory. The exercises in harmony and counterpoint, together with Grieg’s self-biographical sketch “My first success”, is among the most important primary sources in the research on Grieg’s early years. The source material is central to still ongoing debates regarding Grieg’s student years, but a detailed study presenting the structure and contents of it has, until now, been missing in the literature. The data presented and discussed in this paper, including a complete counting and categorization of the exercises in Grieg’s workbooks, is based on results from a recently finished master’s thesis on Grieg’s theory studies.

Åpen tilgang
Vitenskapelig publikasjon
(side 79-101)
av Asbjørn Ø. Eriksen
Engelsk sammendrag

Nikolay Myaskovsky (1881–1950) was highly esteemed as a Soviet composer, only surpassed by Prokofiev and Shostakovich among his contemporaries, and in the West famous conductors like Stokowski and Furtwängler performed his symphonies. Interest in Myaskovsky’s music waned after his death, but thanks to recordings of all his twenty-seven symphonies and to his first extensive biography in English (2014), new listeners have become aware of this composer.

The author offers a consideration of Myaskovsky’s development as a symphonist, focusing on style and sources of influence, and the way his symphonies reflect the ideological climate of the Soviet Union in the 1920s and during the Stalinist regime. The composer reached a peak in his symphonic oeuvre with his monumental Sixth Symphony (1921–23), which reflects the suffering of the Russian people as a consequence of the Russian Revolution. While Myaskovsky tried out different formal solutions and styles in his symphonies dating from the 1920s, he tried to satisfy the doctrine of Socialist realism in Symphony numbers 14 to 27 (1933–49), and the idiom becomes quite retrospective, harking back to the style of Russian composers from the nineteenth century. Myaskovsky’s music lacks the irony and grotesque humour that distinguish several of Prokofiev’s and Shostakovich’s works, but at his best he grips us with a focused and distinctive voice.

Åpen tilgang
Vitenskapelig publikasjon
(side 102-117)
av Kai Arne Hansen
Engelsk sammendrag

This article investigates the children’s TV programme Sangfoni, with a focus on its intersecting aesthetic, pedagogical and sociocultural dimensions. Combining theories and methods from the fields of music education, critical musicology, and popular music studies, the author’s approach is interdisciplinary, and places a particular emphasis on interpretation and audiovisual analysis. As a contribution to the burgeoning field of research into children’s audiovisual culture, the article attempts to clarify how the augmented reality that is presented in Sangfoni functions as a catalyst both for an aesthetic learning process and the exploration of identity. The significance of children’s audiovisual music experiences as a foundation for identity work is central. The audiovisual construction of gendered identity receives particular attention, and the author argues that Sangfoni presents young viewers with a repertoire of symbolic expressions that can be incorporated in their own exploration of identity.

1-2018, årgang 44

www.idunn.no/smn

Studia Musicologica Norvegica (etablert 1968) er et fagfellebasert tidsskrift for musikkvitenskap. Det fungerer som bindeledd mellom musikkforskere og musikkinteresserte i Norge, samtidig som det er norsk musikkforsknings ansikt utad. Tidsskriftet inneholder artikler, bokanmeldelser og essays av musikkvitenskapelig karakter. Innholdet spenner fra musikkhistorie til etnomusikologi, musikksosiologi og musikkteori. Studia Musicologica Norvegica leses av musikkforskere og ‑studenter, høyskolelektorer, musikkpedagoger og allment musikkinteresserte.

Ansvarlig Redaktør

Arnulf Christian Mattes, førsteamanuensis, Leder for Senter for Griegforskning, UiB

Redaksjonssekretær

Aud Aasen

Redaksjonsmedlemmer

Sigbjørn Apeland (UiB)

Robin Rolfhamre (UiA)

Thomas Hilder (NTNU)

Design/sats: Laboremus Sandefjord AS

Design omslag: Erlend Askhov

ISSN online: 1504-2960

DOI: 10.18261/issn.1504-2960

Tidsskriftet utgis av Universitetsforlaget på vegne av Norsk musikkforskerlag og med støtte fra Norges forskningsråd.

© Universitetsforlaget 2018 / Scandinavian University Press

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