The implementation of the first Sámi curriculum in 1997 can be understood as a significant turning point for Sámi education in Norway. The division between the national curriculum and the Sámi curriculum makes it possible to distinguish the “Sámi school” from the “national school”. This article examines what place the Sámi content has in the current curricula: the National Curriculum for Knowledge Promotion in Primary and Secondary Education and Training (Kunnskapsløftet) and the Sami Curriculum for Knowledge Promotion in Primary and Secondary Education and Training (Kunnskapsløftet Samisk). The article analyses some key concepts, which in various ways indicate that the implementation of the Sámi curriculum has resulted in significantly less Sámi content in the national curriculum. Consequently, the Sámi curriculum can be understood as merely a symbolic commitment.

Keywords: Sami education, Sami school, indigenous peoples, curriculum